Favourite FI Podcasts

I love podcasts as they provide a way for me to learn something while I’m out walking/running/driving/what have you.

Here are some of my favourite FI podcasts:

ChooseFI  :  “Join a global community of people that are pursuing Financial Independence through Investing, Real Estate and Business creation.” The why of FI is one of my all time favourite episodes.

Afford Anything:  “You Can Afford Anything … Just Not Everything. What’s It Gonna Be?”

The Mad Fientist:  “Join the Mad Fientist as he talks to personal-finance icons about investing and all things related to early retirement and financial independence!”

Planet Money:  “The economy, explained, with stories and surprises. Imagine you could call up a friend and say, “Meet me at the bar and tell me what’s going on with the economy.” Now imagine that’s actually a fun evening. That’s what we’re going for at Planet Money. People seem to like it.”

For a more local flavour try The Happy Saver Podcast:  “Saving, investing and learning about personal finance in New Zealand. Debt free and saving hard. What on earth could I invest in and how do I do it?”

 

Which are your favourites?

Where are you on your journey to FI/RE?

One of my favourite podcasts is ChooseFI and over the weekend I listened to a cracking episode with with Joel of Financial 180.   The topic was the “Milestones of FI” and I thought it would be interesting to think about where each of us is on our journey.

Milestone 1:  Positive net worth

You hit your first milestone when your debts no longer outweigh your assets.  Some folks are fortunate and never start out with debt but, for most of us, we will normally start out with some debt e.g. a student loan.

Milestone 2:  $100K net worth

If you are a Personal Capital (financial tracking tool – US only so not much use for us) user then apparently when you hit $100K they start phoning you up to try and sell you their paid services.  It’s a somewhat arbitrary point but I think there is something deeply satisfying about hitting round numbers so I think it applies to us Kiwis as well.

Milestone 3:  F#$% U! money

F#$% U! money is classified as having about 2-3 years of expenses saved up.  Your amount will vary depending on your risk tolerance.  I’m reasonably risk averse so for me it would probably be at least 5 years!  It’s called “F#$% U” money as it enables you to walk away from a bad job if necessary.

Milestone 4:  Half FI

You need to know your “number” in order to know when you hit this mark.  You need to know how much you spend/want to spend and multiply that by 25 to get the standard FI amount.  Divide that by 2 and you have your half FI milestone number.

Milestone 5:  Lean FI

Lean FI is the amount you need to basically just survive with very little discretionary spending.  This is a bit extreme for me as I like some of life’s little luxuries but some folks are quite happy being relatively hardcore.

Milestone 6:  The crossover point

This is where you start to earn more from your investments than you are managing to earn from your salary.  You may feel that this makes you FI but realistically investment income can fluctuate so it is just a milestone.

Milestone 7:  Flex FI

Flex FI occurs when you are close enough that you are likely to be safe especially if you retain flexibility in your spending patterns or are willing to return to some form of work if your investment returns drop dramatically.  The value for this milestone is a net worth of 20x your annual spending.  I personally exclude my home from my net worth as it doesn’t generate an income but you may wish to include it if you are happy to sell up to support RE.

Milestone 8:  Financial Independence

You are technically financially independent when you hit a net worth of 25x your annual spending.  Any work you do now is by choice.  You could retire early and be reasonably sure you would not run out of money.

Milestone 9:  Fat FI

Fat FI is what you aim for if you are very risk averse or you want a retirement that has room for a large amount of luxuries.  The value for this milestone is a net worth of about 30x your annual spending.

The journey to FI can often seem long and boring.  Having a list of milestones that you can tick off seems like a good idea.  I’d strongly urge you to listen to ChooseFI and visit Financial 180.

Which milestone are you up to?

Accelerating your path to financial independence and retiring earlier

(This is an edited repost from the New Zealand Wealth and Risk blog, originally published on 30 May 2017.) 

Life is full of seasons. There are times in life when it’s harder to build wealth, such as when you’re a student, or you have a new-born child. And there are times in life when it’s easier, such as when you’re a working empty-nester with no mortgage and serious savings.

There are a number of life events that can put you in a position to turbo charge your path to financial independence and early retirement. It’s valuable to be aware of these situations and taking advantage of these opportunities when they arise. If you’re not mindful, you might find that your excess cash gets eaten up in lifestyle expenses that, while nice, may not help you with your ultimate goal of becoming financially independent and retiring early.

For example:

When you couple up for the first time. When two people move in together, they often find that many of their expenses reduce. You often find that something that you would’ve had to buy on your own, is now effectively half the price because you’re sharing the item and its cost. It’s valuable to use this as an opportunity to increase your savings rate.

When you pay off your student loan. If you have a New Zealand student loan and you’re working in New Zealand, you effectively have a 10% additional tax on your income in the form of student loan repayments. Once the loan is repaid, you essentially get a 10% pay increase. If you were able to live without this 10% before, it’s a good idea to “pay yourself first” and let it bump up your saving rate.

When you pay off your mortgage. Paying off the mortgage is a huge financial milestone. Once the mortgage is out of the way, you’ll have a lot of extra cash flow to put towards building up wealth. (The sooner you can pay off the mortgage, the better your long-term situation is likely to be. Consider the difference between repaying a mortgage at the age of, say, 40 compared to the age of 60. That’s an extra 20 years of extra cash flow.)

When you’re able to self-insure. For any given level of cover, personal insurance premiums will generally increase over time. (The biggest risk factor for most health issues is age…) Ideally, however, your insurance needs should reduce over time as you become better positioned to self-insure. The sooner you can get into the virtuous cycle of having enough wealth to be able to self-insure in relation to most events, the less you’ll need insurance, and the more you can put the money that would have gone towards premiums into building more wealth.

Whenever you get a decent raise. If you’re used to living on a certain level of income, a raise is a bonus – you have money that you previously didn’t need. Consider pre-committing to saving a portion of any future raises, which over time, will result in the percentage of your income that you save continuing to increase.

Don’t get me wrong – when you have an event that frees up cash flow, it’s great to increase your spending and the quality of your life. But as with any spending decision you make, it’s important to make decisions that align with your long-term goals and values. If you’re reading this blog, it’s likely you’ll want to take advantage of these milestones to help you become financially independent sooner and retire earlier.